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Tales of a City by the Sea

Theatre

‘Tales of a City by the Sea’ is a perceptive story that magnificently captures the drama of star-crossed lovers in the besieged Gaza strip.

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This is wide-eyed saga of everyday Palestinians struggling to survive and find normality, hope and love in a region affected by hostility.  It is an oddly poetic tale, whose complexity and subtleties of differing narrative viewpoint are maintained by axioms, a strong multi-cultural ensemble and superb lead performances.

Samah Sabawi’s script has received widespread acclaim for its insight into Palestinian life. The playwright’s remarkable sensitivity and artistry confers enormous authority on this portrayal of a beleaguered people.

The play focuses on Jomana (Helena Sawires), a Palestinian woman living in a refugee camp, and depicts life under the Israeli bombardment and siege.  She is chaperone to her cousin Lama (Emina Ashman), who is unhappily engaged to Ali (Reece Vella).

When Rami (Osamah Sami), an American-born Palestinian doctor, arrives on the “Free Gaza” boats in August 2008, he and Jomana fall in love. When it is time to leave, Rami promises to sell his clinic in America and return to Jomana and his ancestral homeland.

The play gives us a prophetic flavour of the way people can culturally, politically, ideologically and physically be separated. There are sharp, pertinent scenes in which the lovers speak over Skype and renew their promises. But will the pair live happily ever after?

This play stands or falls by its love affair between the thoroughly decent Texan doctor, Rami, and the poetically romantic Jomana. And this love affair has all the passion of desperate people in desperate times and precarious situations.  Sawires is well cast; she puts presence into every scene and bounces well off Sami, who brilliantly portrays an American caught between multiple loyalties.

As doomed wartime romances go, the play doesn’t offer anything particularly original. But with palpable tension and poignancy, and an expose of Palestinian life, it is fine theatre well worth watching. The action is robust when depicting the havoc wreaked on life, limb and landscape.

Perhaps occasionally it is too genteel a view of war’s impact on the heart. However, one always gets the sense that the lovers are involved in something that is truly out of their control, and that’s the saddest thing of all.

Tales of a City by the Sea is playing at the Bakehouse Theatre until June 18.

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