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Your views: on 5G, Crows and Hong Kong

Reader contributions

Today, readers comment on 5G-coronavirus conspiracies, local AFL recruitment and China’s new national security law for Hong Kong.

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Commenting on the story: Phone towers targeted amid virus-5G conspiracy theory

I have read with a mixture of horror and amusement at the brazen senselessness of people who seriously think that a virus can be spread over the airwaves. There has never been any scientific theory that supports the notion that a virus can be emanated from any radio wave of any frequency.

This situation simply proves that our education system needs to do a much better job teaching people about current technology, how it works and the background to why it works. I believe most people are walking around without a clue about how their phones actually work.

I’m pretty sure there are some agitators in the background having a wonderful time knowing they’ve managed to spawn this reaction in the community.

If 5G technology is that capable I want it to deliver my lunchtime sandwiches. Cheese and pickled onion please. It should be a breeze if it can spread a virus that’s resulted in a global pandemic. Bob Sibson

Commenting on the story: Inside the Crow’s downfall: Who really pulls the recruiting strings?

As a man who sells his soul for money in pursuit of “happiness” ends up broken, so too a club that sells its authentic identity to secure “the best talent” in pursuit of success.

The Adelaide Football Club’s authentic identity is “The Pride of South Australia”. To embody this, most of the club’s players must be SA born and bred.

Despite claims to the contrary, the Crows have made little effort to show positive bias towards SA kids at the draft in the last 15 years or so. The result?  Our best players (recruited from interstate) leave the club to return home, good SA players drafted to interstate clubs don’t feel the tribal pull to lure them home, Crows fans lose their passion as the club feels hollow of meaning, and overall the on-field performance falters, leaving us where we are now.

Solution?  Get real, get South Australians at the draft. Lets become the “authentic football club” that Phil Walsh wanted us to be. – Daniel Hanisch

Commenting on the opinion piece: Boot descends upon Hong Kong rule of law

The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) is vested with independent judicial power, including that of final adjudication in accordance with the Basic Law.

The National Security Law will not affect Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy, judicial independence and the rule of law.

Judicial independence means that the judges are free from interference when hearing cases. The relevant provision of the National Security Law merely makes it clear that the Chief Executive of the HKSAR shall designate, in different levels of courts, a list of judges who are suitable to hear cases that endanger national security, rather than choosing a judge to preside over a specific case.

Judges designated from courts at all levels are responsible for hearing cases involving offences endangering national security. Unless national secrets are involved, the trial shall be held in open court and all judgements be announced to the public.

The Department of Justice will continue to be free from interference in its criminal prosecution work. Any decisions that the Department of Justice is going to make in relation to prosecutorial decision, will and always be based on fact and evidence provided through the law enforcement agencies. Raymond Fan, Director, Representative to Australia and New Zealand, Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, Sydney

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