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Books & Poetry

Poem: Wilpena Being

Books & Poetry

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This week’s poem is from Junette Schoell, who says she finds inspiration in the experiences of nature – both old and renewed – as well as from strong personal moments and challenges.

Wilpena Being

Solid earth’s core,
jagged and splintered by the ages.
Timeless sheer face, red
but not ashamed by its exposure.
The flaking skin, the pocked marks
beauty from within,
patiently waiting refinement
by drenching rains of some future date.
From the inner being comes the clinal ridge
to cap this braided plain where life abounds.
A simple pure buttercup or bluebell rises up.
A vast purple blanket ripples the gentle hills.
Frogs croak, emu and magpie peck the floor,
kangaroo and rabbit scent among the flaming hops,
and shadows lengthen as the sun filters
through the silver grey sentinels,
sometimes yellow crested,
sturdy and sure of their life
from beneath the gravel bed.
Satin smooth and fluid,
purple veined arms reach up,
entwine and hold close
the secrets of this sleeping cradle,
where life has begun yet again.

Are we daring too near?
To distraction our mind’s eye is routed by
a sudden wind,
that buffets and whirls our thoughts
and blasts with sand the printed page,
so grotesque
after the simple Sacred Circles,
that speak the never-ending message
of this great heart of our being.

Junette Schoell, born in the Barossa Valley, lives on the slopes of Victoria’s Dandenong Ranges. She began writing poetry when she was a young teacher on Kangaroo Island.

Readers’ original and unpublished poems up to 30 lines can be emailed, with postal address, to poetscorner@solsticemedia.com.au. A poetry book will be awarded to each contributor.

 

 

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