All the good charities already have big celebrity names attached to them, so comedian Sam Simmons went on a hunt for a cause that wasn’t taken.

He spends this show raising awareness for “people with not good knees” ­–  a charity just as noble as any of the other not-for-profits – in the only way he knows how: by challenging himself to balance things on his able knees.

Simmons’ brand of kooky is an acquired taste for some, but for this night’s crowd it’s a quick acquisition. He constantly ribs a section of the audience for not showing enough enthusiasm, but in reality, you’d be hard-pressed to find someone not howling at the ridiculous quips.

The show resembles a juicy gossip column, with Simmons dishing the dirt on the big names in showbiz; the only caveat – of all his stories, only one is true. Or at least half true.

Learn about an action hero’s love child, discover just what Simmons and Tobey Maguire get up to when left alone in IKEA, and find out just how good Mark Beretta’s throwing arm is.

Fact or fiction, Simmons’ celebrity stories are a wild ride through one of comedy’s oddest minds and it’s a magnificent place to visit for an hour. You’ll catch yourself wondering why you’re laughing, while being completely unable to stop.

Simmons is known for his musical comedy and on-the-spot songs about audience members give a little teaser, although a couple of other numbers would have been a welcome addition.

Taking questions from the crowd at the end, the comedian is quick-witted and ready to engage. There’s some good-natured heckling – something Simmons deals with expertly. He ends with his own self-depreciating review of the performance, but it’s easy to disagree.

Sam Simmons is Putting Things on His Knee to Raise Awareness for People Who Not have Good Knees is playing at The Spiegeltent at The Garden of Unearthly Delights until March 21.

Read more Adelaide Fringe reviews and previews  here.

 

Make a comment View comment guidelines

Support local arts journalism

InReview is a ground-breaking publication providing local and professional coverage of the arts in South Australia. Your tax-deductible donation will go directly to support this independent, not-for-profit, arts journalism and critique.

Donate Here

This article is supported by the Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas.