When the raucousness of a crowd sits perfectly in harmony with the palpable excitement of the performers, you just know it’s going to be a good time, and it was all about mutual exhilaration at Club Briefs International.

The last time the Briefs Factory ensemble was on the same stage together was last year’s Adelaide Fringe, and faced with 12 months without performances, they’ve been perfecting their body-bending moves and bedazzling every inch of their costumes in preparation.

The night’s MC and troupe co-founder Shivannah, aka Fez Faanana, will take your hand (metaphorically during these times, of course) and introduce you to a cast of fabulous artists who don’t take themselves too seriously, but deserve to be taken very seriously.

The pinnacle of the show comes early with the aerial hoop skills of Australia’s Got Talent alumni Thomas Worrell, who has performed in musicals and international circus troupes. His piece starts out as a little comedic relief, but the laughter quickly turns to gasps of awe from a captivated crowd.

No doubt the most-talked-about moment involves the group’s youngest performer, Louis Biggs, and without giving it all away, you’ll never quite look at a yo-yo the same.

The individuality of each performer is celebrated as conventional ideas of femininity and masculinity are crushed by sky-high stilettos.

There are moments of ab-clenching laughter and squeal-inducing surprises, but the show is much more than a glittery gimmick. The performers are wildly talented and feature a gold-medal-winning diver and an artist who has worked with Kylie Minogue, Rhianna and Elton John.

There’s no other way to leave the show than on a deliciously devilish high.

Club Briefs International is playing in the Garden of Unearthly Delights until March 21.

Read more Adelaide Fringe reviews and previews  here.

 

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