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Carrie's back - and so is the gore

Film & TV

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For many people, high school can be a nightmare; for Carrie White, it is torture.

Raised by her fanatically religious mother, shy Carrie has been unfairly labelled a “freak” by her peers and is constantly victimised by the school’s Queen Bee, Chris, and her followers. When she is humiliated during a particularly cruel prank, Carrie discovers she has an unusual gift that allows her to move objects with her mind.

Then she is invited to the prom, and it seems her life is finally starting to turn around – until one heartless act ruins everything and sees her wreak revenge on those who have wronged her. And so begins a night filled with carnage and mayhem; a night that will end in tragedy.

Director Kimberly Peirce does a brilliant job of remaking this cult classic, based on the Stephen King novel of the same name. Fans familiar with the 1976 film will be pleased to see she has gone to great lengths to stay true to the original, and her fresh take on the infamous pig’s blood scene is superb. Expertly crafted special effects bring Carrie’s deadly rampage to life in stunning (often graphic) detail.

I was sceptical of Chloe Grace Moretz’s ability to handle the emotional demands of the role of Carrie, but the young actress exceeds expectations, portraying a character who elicits both sympathy and fear. Her powerful performance during the movie’s infamous prom scene is a far cry from the foul-mouthed little girl who shocked us all in Kick Ass.

Julianne Moore brings a frightening intensity to the part of Margaret White, Carrie’s deranged mother, while Judy Greer plays the girl’s gym teacher (and self-appointed protector) Ms Desjardin and Portia Doubleday creates a truly malicious Chris, the quintessential school bully.

With a stellar cast and emotionally charged script, Carrie is sure to bring back some unwelcome memories of high school, and there is something strangely satisfying about watching the bullies get their just desserts. Filled with gore, violence and a bucket-load of teen angst, this remake is sure to make Stephen King proud.

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