InDaily InDaily

Support independent Journalism Donate Subscribe
Support independent journalism

Film

I, Frankenstein

Film

Comments
Comments Print article

After the death of his creator, an angry Frankenstein finds himself drawn into a centuries-old war between the Gargoyles (heavenly beings sent to protect mankind) and Demons (vicious creatures who seek to harness the power of his immortality).

A few hundred years later, Frankenstein – played by Aaron Eckhart and endearingly dubbed “Adam” by Leonore, queen of the Gargoyles (Miranda Otto) – now stalks the dimly-lit streets of the modern world, leaving a trail of slain demons in his wake.

When a new threat emerges in the form of demon prince Naberius (Bill Nighy), he is once again forced into an uneasy alliance with the Gargoyles and so begins an epic battle for the fate of mankind.

Based on the graphic novel I, Frankenstein written by Kevin Grevioux (who plays the demon Dekar), and featuring the character created by Mary Shelley, this film has much potential yet seems to fall flat, despite the efforts of its talented cast.

Eckhart (Olympus Has Fallen) is surprisingly good as the cynical hero Frankenstein/Adam (trivia enthusiasts may be interested to know that Adam was one of the names given to the creature in Shelley’s original story). Nighy once again proves himself to be quite the formidable villain as Naberius, and Yvonne Strahovski plays human scientist Terra who, stereotypically, becomes the only person capable of thawing Frankenstein’s hardened heart.

Unfortunately, the script does little to challenge the audience, and I, Frankenstein would have benefitted from more action sequences to liven up some of the slower scenes. The film’s breath-taking special effects are its saving grace; a lot of effort has gone into giving the Gargoyles and Demons their own identity as species. The Gargoyles’ stunning transformation from gnarled stone statues to stately warriors is a highlight of the film.

While not the greatest tribute to Mary Shelley’s infamous creature, I, Frankenstein deserves credit for its unique and at times entertaining approach to this timeless monster tale.

Make a comment View comment guidelines

Make your contribution to independent news

A donation of any size to InDaily goes directly to helping our journalists uncover the facts. South Australia needs more than one voice to guide it forward, and we’d truly appreciate your contribution. Please click below to donate to InDaily.

Donate here
Powered by PressPatron

Comments

Show comments Hide comments
Will my comment be published? Read the guidelines.

More Film stories

Loading next article